Sealant not applied in correct application size, resulting in nowhere for solvents to go for proper cure. Yellowing is usually attributed to two things: too large of material applied or two materials in proximity to each other which are not compatible. 

Sealant not applied in correct application size, resulting in nowhere for solvents to go for proper cure. Yellowing is usually attributed to two things: too large of material applied or two materials in proximity to each other which are not compatible. 

Your customer is very excited about the coated glass wall cladding designed for her conference room—beautifully colored panels around the space will give the bright, crisp modern look she is eager to show off to her colleagues and guests.  The dominant feature on the north wall will be a large, glass whiteboard—ready to take on a frenzy of notes and illustrations for years to come.

The glass has arrived on the jobsite carefully packaged and your inspection of the product is complete—the glass looks wonderful.  On to the installation…let’s get this project done!  You get the glass installed and it looks fantastic!  About a month later, you get a call from a very upset customer—the whiteboard has large, yellowish stains showing through the coated side—it’s an unsightly, embarrassing disaster!  And it’s going to cost you a lot of time, money and a tarnished reputation.

Let’s rewind the story (if only we could do that in real life, right?):  “The glass looks wonderful.  On to the installation…let’s get this project done!”  STOP!  This is the critical moment where the job can go very well…or very bad.  You will likely not see it go bad immediately—it could take weeks, months or even beyond a year for failures to reveal themselves.

                  So, how can we make sure the project will not fail?  I’m glad you asked!

  • Call the coating manufacturer and the manufacturers of all your other glazing components before you proceed with the installation—a few phone calls and a little time spent gathering important information will make all the difference!
  • Verify material compatibility with all components used in the glazing—make sure all materials you intend to use are approved for use with each other by each manufacturer.
  • Acquire and follow specific application instructions provided by all component manufacturers—including surface preparation, sealant selection, application usage amounts and configurations, cure times and conditions.
  • Finally, call the manufacturers!  Did I already say that?  Yes, it’s that important!

 Having done all of the above, rewind the story one last time:  “You get the glass installed and it looks fantastic!  About a month later, you get a call from…” a very happy customer who wants to let you know, again, how pleased she is with your work!

Question:  Do you take the time to collect all of the important information you should for your projects?                 

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